20 Picturesque Mountains in The World

Photography

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Some of the most beautiful outdoor scenes to photograph are mountains and lakes. Our planet is scattered with spectacular mountains some worldwide known, others obscure, but all beautiful in their own way, if you’ve got the patience, you can try to get a perfect mountain reflection.

Here are 20 pictures most impressive and beautiful mountains in the world, all taken by professional photographers.

Mount Teide, Spain

Mount-Teide
Photo credit: Pawel Lappo
Mount Teide is a volcano on Tenerife in the Canary Islands. Its 3,718-metre summit is the highest point in Spain and the highest point above sea level in the islands of the Atlantic.

Kirkjufell, Iceland

Kirkjufell
Photo credit: Terry Cheng
Kirkjufell is a 463m high mountain on the north coast of Iceland. The lines of its sediment are very pronounced though, and have an orderly, sculptured look. The slope of the base is very smooth and even, creating a symmetrical appearance. So despite the fact that it is not particularly vast, it has its own unique, almost architectural beauty. It is one of the most recognizable sights in all of Iceland, and attracts numerous tourists every year.

Eiger, Switzerland

Eiger
Photo credit: Chris Hopkins
The Eiger is a 3,970 metres (13,020 ft) mountain of the Bernese Alps, overlooking Grindelwald and Lauterbrunnen in the Bernese Oberland. This mountain is rather imposing to look at, but also very beautiful. Its rock face is quite challenging to scale, and many climbers have perished in the attempt. It was first climbed from the north side in 1938 by Anderl Heckmar.

Mount Fuji, Japan

Mount-Fuji
Photo credit: Alex Budiman
Mount Fuji, located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m. An active stratovolcano that last erupted in 1707–08, Mount Fuji lies about 100 kilometres south-west of Tokyo, and can be seen from there on a clear day.

Mount McKinley, Alaska

Mount-McKinley
Photo credit: Daniel Leifheit
Mount McKinley is the highest mountain peak in Denali National Park, Alaska with a summit elevation of 20,237 feet above sea level. Many tours go to Denali every year, featuring amazing views of the mountain which towers 20,320 feet above the landscape. While this is not the highest mountain peak, the dramatic difference in elevation from base to summit and the relatively un-occluded view make it quite majestic to behold. Just looking at photographs of Denali, you may feel dwarfed and humbled. Just imagine how you would feel in its presence, standing near the base and looking up toward the sky

Chocolate Hills, Philippines

Chocolate-Hills
Photo credit: Lemuel Montejo
The Chocolate Hills are a geological formation in Bohol Province, Philippines. There are at least 1,260 hills but there may be as many as 1,776 hills spread over an area of more than 50 square kilometres.

Mount Rainier, USA

Mount-Rainier
Photo credit: David Irons Jr
Mount Rainier is a massive stratovolcano located 54 miles (87 km) southeast of Seattle in the state of Washington, United States. It is the most topographically prominent mountain in the contiguous United States and the Cascade Volcanic Arc, with a summit elevation of 14,411 ft (4,392 m). Mt. Rainier is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world, and it is on the Decade Volcano list. Because of its large amount of glacial ice, Mt. Rainier could potentially produce massive lahars that would threaten the whole Puyallup River valley.

Table Mountain, South Africa

Table-Mountain
Photo credit: Daniel Morgan
Table Mountain is a flat-topped mountain forming a prominent landmark overlooking the city of Cape Town in South Africa, and is featured in the Flag of Cape Town and other local government insignia. This mountain, like Kirkjufell, is another horizontal peak which does not reach particularly high. Despite this, it is very lovely to behold, especially as it rises against the sea, echoing the strong horizontal of the ocean.

Huayna Picchu, Peru

Huayna-Picchu
Photo credit: David Durcak
The Incas really knew what they were doing when choosing a site for their famous city, Machu Picchu. Surrounded by layers of lush mountains, Machu Picchu is a gem of humanity amidst the grandeur of nature. The most striking mountain in the region is Huayna Picchu, which watches over the ancient city. Visitors up for the challenge can climb the peak for a bird’s eye view of the ruins.

Dolomites, Italy

Dolomites
Photo credit: Danilo Di Giovanni
The Dolomites are a mountain range located in northeastern Italy. They form a part of Southern Limestone Alps and extend from the River Adige in the west to the Piave Valley in the east.

Scandinavian Mountains, Norway

Scandinavian-Mountains
Photo credit: Jani Ylinampa
The Scandinavian Mountains or the Scandes are a mountain range that runs through the Scandinavian Peninsula. The Scandinavian Mountains are equivalent to the Scandinavian Caledonides. The western sides of the mountains drop precipitously into the North Sea and Norwegian Sea, forming the famous fjords of Norway, while to the northeast they gradually curve towards Finland. To the north they form the border between Norway and Sweden, still reaching 2,000 m high (6,600 ft) at the Arctic Circle. The mountain range just touches northwesternmost Finland, but are scarcely more than hills at their northernmost extension at the North Cape.

Tre Cime di Lavaredo, Italy

Tre-cime-di-Lavaredo
Photo credit: Alex Budiman
The Tre Cime di Lavaredo, also called the Drei Zinnen, are three distinctive battlement-like peaks, in the Sexten Dolomites of northeastern Italy. They are probably one of the best-known mountain groups in the Alps. In the Dolomites of northeastern Italy, three massive hunks of rock burst from the earth. These incredible mountains, lined up like bowling pins, are celebrated by hikers, bikers and nature lovers.

Machapuchare, Nepal

Machapuchare
Photo credit: Prakash Bajracharya
Machapuchare is a mountain in the Annapurna Himal of north central Nepal. It is revered by the local population as particularly sacred to the god Shiva, and hence is off limits to climbing.

Alpamayo, Peru

Alpamayo
Photo credit: Stephane Charmoillaux
Alpamayo, Allpamayu or Shuyturahu is one of the most conspicuous peaks in the Cordillera Blanca of the Peruvian Andes. It is named after the river Allpamayu which originates northwest of it.

Cerro Torre, Argentina

Cerro-Torre
Photo credit: Rémi Boucher
Cerro Torre is one of the mountains of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field in South America. It is located in Argentina, west of Cerro Chaltén. In Into Thin Air, writer and mountaineer Jon Krakauer describes ascending the peak: “I’d scaled a frightening, mile-high spike of vertical and overhanging granite called Cerro Torre; buffeted by hundred-knot winds, plastered with frangible atmospheric rime, it was once (though no longer) thought to be the world’s hardest mountain.”

Belukha Mountain, Russia

Belukha-Mountain
Photo credit: Iarik Gerasymenko
Belukha Mountain, located in the Katun Mountains, is the highest peak of the Altai Mountains in Russia. It is part of the World Heritage Site entitled Golden Mountains of Altai.

Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Mount-Kilimanjaro
Photo credit: Hamad Darwish
Mount Kilimanjaro, with its three volcanic cones, Kibo, Mawenzi and Shira, is a dormant volcanic mountain in Tanzania. It is the highest mountain in Africa and the highest free-standing mountain in the world at 5,895 metres above sea level.

Seoraksan National Park, South Korea

Seoraksan-National-Park
Photo credit: Jay Daley
Seoraksan National Park is a national park in South Korea. It listed by the South Korean government with UNESCO as a tentative World Heritage site.

Nanga Parbat, Pakistan

Nanga-Parbat
Photo credit: Tanwir Muhammad
Nanga Parbat is the ninth highest mountain in the world at 8,126 metres above sea level. It is the western anchor of the Himalayas around which the Indus river skirts before it debouches into the plains of Pakistan.

Mount Tai, China

Mount-Tai
Photo credit: Sean Lee
The word “tai” in Chinese means stability and peace and the name Tai’an is attributed to the saying: “If Mount Tai is stable, so is the entire country”. Many ancient Chinese emperors performed mountain worship ceremonies on Mount Tai. It is said to be the first and foremost thing for emperors to do when they ascend to the throne, because Mount Tai is seen as the symbol of the county’s peace and prosperity.

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